Gorgeous Scoop-Necked Cabled Sweater – Olwen Sweater Pattern

olwen3pdfbutton
OlwenUpdated.pdf

It’s finished!!  And, I love it!  The yarn is soft and warm, the cables are classic and beautiful, and the darned thing fits the way it should!

I’ve given it a Welsh name -Olwen- just for the heck of it and I’ve graded it across 6 different sizes so hopefully something will work for you.  It’s my first graded sweater pattern.  Pretty exciting!  🙂

For those who would like to recreate this, click the pdf link above or here’s the spill:olwen

Skill Level- Intermediate

Finished Measurements (Chest) in inches– 32 (35, 38, 41, 44, 47) Shown in size 41 with no ease.

Yarn- Knit Picks City Tweed HW (or other worsted weight yarn)  890 ( 981, 1112, 1244, 1365, 1474) yds or 6 (6, 7, 8, 9, 9) balls.

Gauge- 3.8 stitches per inch in moss stitch with larger needle.  (size 8-10 US needle)

Directions:

BODY

Using smaller circular needle, CO 148 (160, 168, 176, 188, 196) sts.  Join for working in the round, being careful not to twist.

Set Up Round:  [k1,p1] repeat 36 (39,  41, 43, 46, 48) more times, pm,  [k1,p1] repeat 36 (39,  41, 43, 46, 48) more times, place round marker.

Ribbing:  Continue in 1×1 ribbing by working sts as they appear for 13 rows.

Begin Pattern:  Switch to larger needle.  Work Chart A for 10 (13, 15, 17, 20, 22) sts, work Chart B for 54 sts, work Chart A for 10 (13, 15, 17, 20, 22) sts, sm, Work Chart A for 10 (13, 15, 17, 20, 22) sts, work Chart B for 54 sts, work Chart A for 10 (13, 15, 17, 20, 22) sts, smOlwenCharts.

Continue Pattern: Continue working pattern charts as established for 61 (63, 65, 65, 67, 67) more rows.

Set Up for Sleeve Join Round:  Work in established pattern until 2 (3, 3, 4, 5, 6) sts before round marker.  Slip next 4 (6, 6, 8, 10, 12) sts onto waste yarn.  Do not break yarn.

SLEEVE (Make Two)

Using smaller circular needle or DPNs, CO 32 (32, 34, 36, 38, 38) sts.  Join for working in the round, being careful not to twist.

Set Up Round:  [k1, p1] repeat 15 (15, 16, 17, 18, 18) more times, place round marker

Ribbing:  Continue in 1×1 ribbing by working sts as they appear for 13 rows.

Pattern Set Up Round:  Switch to larger needle.  Work sts as they appear increasing 4 sts evenly around.  36 (36, 38, 40, 42, 42) sts.

Begin Pattern:  k1, work Chart A for 5 (5, 6, 7, 8, 8) sts, work Chart C for 24 sts, work Chart A for 5 (5, 6, 7, 8, 8) sts, k1, sm

Increase Round:  k1, m1, work pattern as established, m1, k1, sm

Continue working pattern as established while repeating the Increase Round every 4 rows 0 (0, 0, 1, 4, 10) times, then every 6 rows 0 (5, 9, 10, 8, 4) times, then every 8 rows 7 (4, 1, 0, 0, 0) times.  52 (56, 60, 64, 68, 72) sts.  Note: the new stitches made in the increase rounds should be worked in Moss Stitch (Chart A) in subsequent rows.

Work even until arm measures 17.25 (18, 18, 18.25, 18.25, 18.25) inches from cast on ending with an odd numbered row on Chart C.

Set Up for Join Round:  On next row (even numbered) from Chart C, work in pattern until 2 (3, 3, 4, 5, 6) sts before round marker.  Slip next 4 (6, 6, 8, 10, 12) sts onto waste yarn.  Break yarn leaving 18-inch tail to be used to graft underarm seam.  52 (56, 60, 64, 68, 72) sts.

YOKE olwen2

With working yarn from body of the sweater, pm for raglan, work sleeve sts in pattern, pm for raglan, work body sts in pattern until 2 (3, 3, 4, 5, 6) sts before side marker, slip next 4 (6, 6, 8, 10, 12) sts onto waste yarn, pm for raglan, work sleeve sts in pattern, pm for raglan, work in pattern across body until 2 stitches before raglan marker.  236 (244, 264, 276, 288, 296) sts.

Decrease Round:  SSK, sm, k2tog, work sleeve sts in pattern until 2 sts before marker, SSK, sm, k2tog, work body sts in pattern until 2 sts before marker, SSK, sm, k2tog, work sleeve sts in pattern until 2 sts before marker, SSK, sm, k2tog, work body sts in pattern to raglan marker.

Even Round:  work in pattern around to the last 2 sts.

Repeat these two rounds 9 (9, 9, 10, 10, 11) more times.

Work one decrease round.

NECK SHAPING

Neck Bind Off:  work sts in pattern across sleeve, work sts in pattern across back, work sts in pattern across sleeve, work 15 (15, 18, 18, 20, 21) sts in pattern, bind off 16 (18, 18, 20, 20, 20) sts for neck, k1, SSK, work 10 (10, 13, 13, 15, 16) sts in pattern (2 sts before raglan marker). 123 (129, 149, 151, 163, 163) sts.

Decrease Round:  SSK, sm, k2tog, work sleeve sts in pattern until 2 sts before marker, SSK, sm, k2tog, work body sts in pattern until 2 sts before marker, SSK, sm, k2tog, work sleeve sts in pattern until 2 sts before marker, SSK, sm, k2tog, work body sts until 3 sts remain, k2tog, k1.  Turn work

Even Round (WS): Work sts as they appear all the way around.  Turn work.olwen4

Decrease Round (RS): k1, SSK, work in pattern until 2 sts before marker, SSK, sm, k2tog, work sleeve sts in pattern until 2 sts before marker, SSK, sm, k2tog, work body sts in pattern until 2 sts before marker, SSK, sm, k2tog, work sleeve sts in pattern until 2 sts before marker, SSK, sm, k2tog, work body sts until 3 sts remain, k2tog, k1.  Turn work.

Repeat these two rounds 3 (2, 3, 3, 4, 4) more times.  74 (90, 100, 102, 104, 104) sts.

TO THE SHOULDER

Even Round (WS): Work sts as they appear all the way around.  Turn work.

Decrease Round (RS): Work in pattern until 2 sts before marker, SSK, sm, k2tog, work sleeve sts in pattern until 2 sts before marker, SSK, sm, k2tog, work body sts in pattern until 2 sts before marker, SSK, sm, k2tog, work sleeve sts in pattern until 2 sts before marker, SSK, sm, k2tog, work body sts in pattern.  Turn work.

Repeat these two rounds until 1 st remains on each side of front.  42 (42, 44, 46, 48, 48)sts.

Neck Ribbing:  Pick up an additional 46 (52, 56, 58, 62, 62) sts down around the front neck line.  Switch to smaller needles.  1×1 rib for 5 rows.  Bind off loosely.

Under Arm Seam:  Use Kitchener stitch and yarn tail from sleeve to graft seam closed.  Use tail to then close up any holes.

Weave in all ends.olwen5

62 thoughts on “Gorgeous Scoop-Necked Cabled Sweater – Olwen Sweater Pattern

  1. Beautiful… your work is fantastic and the resulting fit looks perfect. You are giving me great inspiration to start in on design work. I know it’s a big undertaking and a tremendous amount of work but the results look like they are well worth it. Great Job!!!

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    • Thanks!! 🙂 I highly recommend exploring design in knitting. It’s a lot of fun and very satisfying when it works out. However, I must admit that I’ve had just as many, probably more, failures than successes. But there is a huge upside with a failure- I learn a lot!

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  2. Beautiful!! Truly lovely knitting! But why do you not sell your pattern? So much work and incredible talent went into that! You are very generous to offer it for free, but I do think you would be honoring your talent by attaching a price to this lovely pattern. Just a thought. 🙂

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    • I really appreciate your feedback Jen! 🙂 The only patterns I’ve ever written are the few that I’ve put up on my blog. I’m dipping my toe in the water to see how my knitting/writing style works for other knitters. In the future, I’d really love to put out a beautiful book of patterns. But for now, I’m happy to share as I learn.

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    • 🙂 It took 10 days from cast on to bind off. This included ripping the yoke all the way back since I put an arm on crooked and I didn’t notice until I got near the end and my stitches on either side of the neck weren’t even. The aran/worsted weight yarn works up pretty quickly. I probably spent 4 – 6 hours every day working on it.

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      • Wow. That’s not too bad for a cabled sweater! I’ve only done two projects in cable and they took forever so I am somewhat skeptical of cabled patterns. I love that sweater though!

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  3. Andre Sue, this is so lovely. And humbling ;-). I still have a lot to learn! It looks gorgeous on you.amd that’s the lovely thing about knitting, isn’t it? You get to spend all that time doing something you love and then to wear it (or see others wear it) is the cherry on the pie…

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    • This is my first tweed project and I can see how it can become an obsession! I’ve ordered a couple more sweaters-worth of different colored tweed. Now all I need is the motivation to knit it all up. I hope you enjoy the pattern! 🙂

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  4. I don’t suppose that anywhere in your notes you have written instructions for the pattern instead of charts? It’s awful, I’ve been knitting for 25 years but I can’t seem to follow charts…always end up transcribing them :s if not I’m still going to attempt this gorgeous sweater!!! Thanks so much for posting it!

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  5. That’s a beautiful sweater. I love Aran-style sweaters but often don’t like the neckline (and I’m not confident enough to change the neckline on designs with cables); I think that one would be just perfect for me. Just need to find the time to make it!

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